When Your Plump Pooch Wants a Meat Treat – Training Tips for Dieting Dogs

When Your Plump Pooch Wants a Meat Treat – Training Tips for Dieting Dogs

These days with modern dog training techniques we recommend using food as the primary motivator.  It all gets a little tricky when we have a dog who loves to scoff food and has a tendency to put on weight, it seems by just sniffing it.  If this is something you experience with your dog, there are some other healthy options you can try.

I like to have a mixture of treats, in a jar, kind of like a pick and mix bag of lollies.  Dogs have their favourites and it helps make things a little more interesting if they don’t know exactly what flavour they’ll be receiving.

For dogs who need to watch their waistline, you can try diced carrots, beans, peas, broccoli, dehydrated chicken, lean beef, dehydrated liver, and fish.

If you’d rather a prepared option check out the ingredients and calorie count on the back of the pack. Choose brands that are low in sugar, fat and other preservatives, there is likely to be a reasonable selection wherever you purchase your dog supplies, read the labels and do a comparison (like we do for our own food). Your vet will also be able to recommend a suitable pre-packaged product.

Be aware of how many training treats you give your dog on a daily basis.  Treats and tidbits should be on average around 10% of a dog’s daily intake.  If you think your dog gets a little more because that’s how your lifestyle works, that’s ok just be aware and adjust the size of his meals accordingly. Awareness around the quantity and quality of treats is important especially if you are leaving enrichment toys containing treats when you leave for work every day.  So being aware of what’s in a treat and the calorie count is really important.  Remember exercise is important to maintain a balanced lifestyle.

Reliable Recalls

Reliable Recalls

Topic: Reliable Recalls – (Training your dog to come every time you call him)

Date: Sunday 7th January

Time: 4pm – 6pm

Location: The Training Paddock – Peninsula Industrial Estate, Woy Woy Rd, Woy Woy

Prior Knowledge: No previous knowledge or experience is required

Format: Workshop with a mix of handlers with dogs (8) and observers without dogs (unlimited). Training ‘Reliable Recalls’ using Master Trainer Louise Harding’s step-by-step approach.

Cost: $75 per person (handlers with dogs) only 8 spaces available. Your dog must be friendly with other dogs and friendly human strangers.

$50 per person (observers without dogs) unlimited spaces.

Drink refreshments will be provided.

> REGISTER NOW or call Louise 0437148402 for more information

Email Louise to Register

 

Loose-lead Walking – Dog Training Workshop – Woy Woy

Loose-lead Walking – Dog Training Workshop – Woy Woy

Topic: Loose-lead Walking

Date: Saturday 6th January

Time: 4pm – 6pm

Location: The Training Paddock – Peninsula Industrial Estate, Woy Woy Rd, Woy Woy

Prior Knowledge: No previous knowledge or experience is required

Format: Workshop with a mix of handlers with dogs (8) and observers without dogs  (unlimited). Training ‘loose-lead walking’ using Master Trainer Louise Harding’s step-by-step approach.

Cost: $75 per person (handlers with dogs) only 8 spaces available. Your dog must be  friendly with other dogs and friendly human strangers.

$50 per person (observers without dogs) unlimited spaces.

Drink refreshments will be provided.

REGISTER NOW > or call Louise 0437148402 for more information

Email Louise to Register
Dog Tips: Please …….Don’t pat the guide dog

Dog Tips: Please …….Don’t pat the guide dog

I’ve been spending a fair amount of time with a friend and her guide dog.  As a professional dog trainer working in the same community I have been aware for some time that there is an enormous amount of education regarding dog behaviour needed.

What I wasn’t aware of was the extent of the problem.

It has been a frequent occurrence while out with my friend to have her guide dog approached without permission, patted, praised, fed, talked to, stared at and generally interfered with by the public.  When politely asked to refrain because their behaviour is interfering with the dog doing his job, a common response is for them to say is “its okay” or “I know I shouldn’t but he’s such a good boy”

To be clear, it is never okay to distract a working guide dog.

I understand that people are drawn to animals, especially dogs, but it is important to recognise that whilst years of training are responsible for these dogs becoming the unique mobility aids that they are,  enhancing their owner’s lives in a way many of us will never fully comprehend.  They are not infallible, the effect of people interfering with the dog is cumulative.  By the end of one days outing there has often been so much interference that the dog’s ability to focus on his job is affected, putting both dog and his vision impaired owner at risk.

These dog/owner “units” deserve to be respected and allowed by the general population to navigate their way through our community with dignity and without interference.

It takes a great deal of concentration for a vision impaired person to work safely with a guide dog.  Here are some ways that you can help:

  • Difficult as it might seem, please try to ignore working guide dogs completely.  This means do not touch, feed, compliment, smile at, talk to, stare at or otherwise distract the dog.  Distractions can undo months of training and have the potential to affect the safety of the ‘unit”
  • If you know the handler and guide dog it is still important that you don’t pay any attention to the dog whilst he is working.
  •  If you see a guide dog in harness, please choose to engage with the human rather than the dog.
  1. You will not be distracting the dog and therefore putting the handler at risk.
  2. You will not be disrespecting the handler by ignoring their presence. Never distract a guide dog or his handler when they are about to cross a road, walk down a flight of steps, alight a bus etc.  It is dangerous to do so.  They need to concentrate on what they are doing.
  • Do not grab the handler or the dogs harness.  This is a common cause of distress.  If they need help they will ask.
  • This is a big one but it’s not that difficult.  However, it is a major problem in our local area.  Unless in an off leash space, please make sure your pet dog is on a leash and under effective control, which means with you. Do not allow your pet dog to wander.  Unfortunately many working guide dogs encounter unwanted, unasked for interactions with both supervised and unsupervised dogs.  This can cause the guide dog to become dog distracted which is a safety issue for both handler and guide dog.  Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for working guide dogs to be attacked.
  • People who use guide dogs have been extensively trained in the most effective way to control their dogs behaviour, so please only provide assistance if requested.

We also have a reasonable number of therapy assistance dogs working in our community.  If you’d like to interact with these dogs please just ask the owner first. Depending on their job the owner may be happy for you to interact with their dog, however it’s a good idea to use the same basic conduct as when meeting a guide dog unless the handler tells you otherwise.

Our greater community really needs to take a breath and look at our interactions with dogs we don’t know.  I have a team of dogs who I train to perform a variety of disciplines and my training is constantly being undermined by strangers approaching my dogs whenever we are out and about. It’s just plain rude and can be dangerous.  We are fortunate that our younger generation seem to be well educated and often it’s the younger generation reminding the older generation about appropriate interactions.

So, just take a second and ask permission first.  You wouldn’t grab someone’s handbag off their shoulder, examine it, and then hand back to the owner.  So, why touch, fondle, or greet a strange dog that way?

Dog Agility Class – Does your dog love to run?

Dog Agility Class – Does your dog love to run?

Do you have an enthusiastic dog who loves to run and you think you’d like to do something a little more interesting?
Coming soon ….

Introduction to agility class to the central coast Monday at 5.30pm.

Dogs must be sociable with other dogs and people and have a reliable recall.  If you don’t have a sociable dog who comes when called – we can help.

All enquiries please contact us.

Two day Seminar by Karen Sadler, April 2015

Two day Seminar by Karen Sadler, April 2015

This two day seminar will target dogs drive, focus and concentration as well as handlers getting it right for their dogs. Animation will also be covered, along with teaching owners how to understand their dogs better so they can then teach any dog to be a great pet or any dog sport they wish to.

 

Presented By Karen Sadler Saturday 4th – Sunday 5th April 2015

This weekend seminar is for anyone who would like to teach their dogs to learn in a positive manner and owners that want to understand their dogs better.
It will cover Motivation, duration and creating a better competition dog as well as behavioral issues for all dog owners.
As one of NZ’s most successful obedience competitors, instructors and animal trainers, Karen Sadler’s achievements include a long list of New Zealand titles gained with her own dogs in many dog sports, including 6 obedience champions. Karen is the Director of Agrade Animals Action Limited, which provides training for domestic dogs, competitive dog sports, and trains a range of animals for film and TV. Karen’s work has featured in well known commercials such as the Roly (Purex), Wiska’s Cat, Dulux paint as well as Film and TV credits, Shortland Street, Bridge to Terabithia, and Whale Rider plus many more.
Karen’s training methods have been widely tested around NZ and in Australia. Adding to her vast practical experience, Karen has completed The Principles of Canine Behavior Paper through Massey University to gain an even greater understanding of the way dogs think and learn.

Karen’s seminar will be held at the Empire Bay Public School, Central Coast – cost is $120/day for handler spot and $60/day for observer spot.  Morning and afternoon tea will be provided.  Individual lessons will also be available on the Monday, $50 for a half hour

AussieSeminar

(Updated):
If you would like to attend >download the flyer here, print it out and send it in via email Louise.

 

Pin It on Pinterest